Mother Magdalena, PA, USA: In Search of Solid Ground – From New Age Hippie to Orthodox Nun

http://www.orthodoxmonasteryellwoodcity.org

ORTHODOX MONASTERY ELLWOOD CITY, PA, USA

Mother Magdalena, PA, USA:

In Search of Solid Ground – From New Age Hippie to Orthodox Nun

Mother Magdalena, from the Orthodox Monastery of the Transfiguration in Ellwood City, Pennsylvania, will share her faith journey and speak on the Theology of Joy.

Mother Magdalena was born the second child in a family of 10 children. She grew up in the Roman Catholic Church, which she loved. During her high school years, the effects of Vatican II on church liturgical life hit, catapulting her out of the church into a search for solid ground to stand on: through the hippie movement, feminism, the New Age, life in a yoga ashram, and humanistic and trans-personal psychologies. These experiences created a hunger for a life grounded in ancient truth rather than made-up ritual or emotional highs. Eventually she joined a group born out of the hippie movement in San Francisco, which, many years later, as a group joined the Orthodox Church, finding there the deepest, clearest path to Christ. These experiences were a perfect segue into monastic life, a life of women led by a woman, holding all in common, living lightly, serving all, filled with the joy of the presence of Christ, rich in the ancient, ever-renewing traditions of Orthodoxy.

Source:

https://events.cornell.edu/event/in_search_of_solid_ground_from_new_age_hippie_to_orthodox_nun

Liturgy: The Meaning and Celebration of the Eucharist – Fr. Thomas Fitzgerald, MA, USA

http://englishorthodoxweb2.blogspot.com

ENGLISH ORTHODOX WEB 2

Liturgy: The Meaning and Celebration of the Eucharist

Fr. Thomas Fitzgerald, USA

╰⊰¸¸.•¨*

Hellenic College Holy Cross,

Brookline, Massachusetts, USA

Source:

http://www.annunciation.bs.goarch.org

http://www.annunciation.bs.goarch.org/our-faith/liturgy

ANNUNCIATION GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH IN NASSAU, BAHAMAS

“We knew not whether we were in heaven or on earth, for surely there is no such splendor or beauty anywhere on earth. We cannot describe it to you; we only know that God dwells there among men and that their Service surpasses the worship of all other places…”

In the latter part of the tenth century, Vladimir the Prince of Kiev sent envoys to various Christian centers to study their form of worship. These are the words the envoys uttered when they reported their presence at the celebration of the Eucharist in the Great Church of Holy Wisdom in Constantinople. The profound experience expressed by the Russian envoys has been one shared by many throughout the centuries who have witnessed for the first time the beautiful and inspiring Divine Liturgy of the Orthodox Church.

The Holy Eucharist is the oldest experience of Christian Worship as well as the most distinctive. Eucharist comes from the Greek word which means thanksgiving. In a particular sense, the word describes the most important form of the Church’s attitude toward all of life. The origin of the Eucharist is traced to the Last Supper at which Christ instructed His disciples to offer bread and wine in His memory. The Eucharist is the most distinctive event of Orthodox worship because in it the Church gathers to remember and celebrate the Life, Death, and Resurrection of Christ and, thereby, to participate in the mystery of Salvation.

In the Orthodox Church, the Eucharist is also known as the Divine Liturgy. The word liturgy means people’s work; this description serves to emphasize the corporate character of the Eucharist. When an Orthodox attends the Divine Liturgy, it is not as an isolated person who comes simply to hear a sermon.

Rather, he comes as a member of the Community of Faith who participates in the very purpose of the Church, which is the Worship of the Holy Trinity. Therefore, the Eucharist is truly the center of the life of the Church and the principal means of spiritual development, both for the individual Christian and the Church as a whole. Not only does the Eucharist embody and express the Christian faith in a unique way, but it also enhances and deepens our faith in the Trinity. This sacrament-mystery is the experience toward which all the other activities of the Church are directed and from which they receive their direction.

The Eucharist, the principal sacrament mystery of the Orthodox Church, is not so much a text to be studied, but rather an experience of communion with the Living God in which prayer , music, gestures, the material creation, art and architecture come into full orchestration. The Eucharist is a celebration of Continue reading “Liturgy: The Meaning and Celebration of the Eucharist – Fr. Thomas Fitzgerald, MA, USA”

The Uncreated Map: Christ as the Light of Yoga – Fr. Joseph Magnus Frangipani, Alaska, USA

https://alaskaofmyheart.wordpress.com

ALASKA OF MY HEART

The Uncreated Map: Christ as the Light of Yoga

By Fr. Joseph Magnus Frangipani,

Alaska, USA

Source:

https://deathtotheworld.com

The Uncreated Map: Christ as the Light of Yoga

DEATH TO THE WORLD

I’m reminded of pilgrims at the Himalayan foothills seeking passage around the icy mouth of the Ganges River. Among these hikers were two very different men, one an intelligent geologist and the other a simple backpacker.

The geologist put every trust in his mind.

As he told others, “I know all there is about the composition of mountains and valleys. I know how they’re formed and why they’re here. Look, I understand everything and really don’t need backcountry camping lessons, nor do I have time to get in shape for this journey.”

So, he left unprepared, but very confident for the hard journey ahead.

Meanwhile, the simple backpacker didn’t count on his intelligence alone. Rather, he worked out every day, getting his body into good health, also while getting to know the locals who passed through these mountains. He learned where to find shelter, what places and people to avoid, and knew precisely where he was going. He was very humble about this undertaking.

At the first snowstorm the first man panicked. He forgot all about geology and his journey grew difficult and painful. The simpler man, however, brought to mind what he learned from those before him, drawing on ancient wisdom and, remembering his maps, actually wound around these mountains with much effort but safely.

One man arrived from his journey to new land.

The proud man was never found.

The secret closet, man’s heart, is the starting place where we embark on this journey. It is concealed by many thorns and bushes, within the folds of our passions, thoughts and ego. Our life, then, may seem a Russian nesting doll. When Christ comes like a gardener, we may not recognize Him. Sometimes it is only when we don’t experience Him, though, that like the Prodigal Son we remember His bread and turn to face Him, which is what repentance is all about.

When we taste life apart from Him, which is not truly life but pigs and husks, we experience a foretaste of hell. This often has profound effects upon a Continue reading “The Uncreated Map: Christ as the Light of Yoga – Fr. Joseph Magnus Frangipani, Alaska, USA”

The Lure of the Mystical Path – Alice Tallmadge, Oregon, USA

http://conversionstoorthodoxy.wordpress.com

CONVERSIONS TO ORTHODOXY

The Lure of the Mystical Path

By

Alice Tallmadge, Correspondent

Originally published in The Oregonian, Sunday, April 9, 2000

From Ashland to Portland, the Orthodox tradition is drawing Oregonians to its ancient depths

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

The Lure of the Mystical Path

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

EUGENE — The Saturday night buzz is revving outside the doors of St. Eugene Orthodox Church in the Whiteaker neighborhood. Motors race. Doors slam. Nearby taverns begin to fill with eager revelers. But inside the walls of the humble, dome-topped church, an otherworldly peace reigns. Pungent incense hangs in the air. Gold-flecked icons, lit by flickering tapers, line the dark red walls. Women, their long hair covered with scarves, stand on one side of the small nave, men on the other.

They take turns filling the room with plaintive, old-world chants. Other worshippers stand quietly, hands to their sides, heads bowed.

“This is how we worship, to stay concentrated in prayer,” said St. Eugene member Sarah Cowie.

“We believe that, during the service, God pours himself out. If you get quiet enough in your mind, you can feel, palpably, his presence.”

The 70 or so members of St. Eugene aren’t immigrants from Russia, Eastern Europe or Greece. They are Eugene-area residents, most of them converts from Protestant sects, who have found solace and sustenance in a tradition that dates back 2,000 years to the early Christian church. Cowie and other St. Eugene members are among the growing numbers of Oregonians who are converting to Orthodoxy.

For years, St. Nicholas Orthodox Church in Portland, established in 1895, was Continue reading “The Lure of the Mystical Path – Alice Tallmadge, Oregon, USA”