The Lure of the Mystical Path – Alice Tallmadge, Oregon, USA

http://conversionstoorthodoxy.wordpress.com

CONVERSIONS TO ORTHODOXY

The Lure of the Mystical Path

By

Alice Tallmadge, Correspondent

Originally published in The Oregonian, Sunday, April 9, 2000

From Ashland to Portland, the Orthodox tradition is drawing Oregonians to its ancient depths

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

The Lure of the Mystical Path

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

EUGENE — The Saturday night buzz is revving outside the doors of St. Eugene Orthodox Church in the Whiteaker neighborhood. Motors race. Doors slam. Nearby taverns begin to fill with eager revelers. But inside the walls of the humble, dome-topped church, an otherworldly peace reigns. Pungent incense hangs in the air. Gold-flecked icons, lit by flickering tapers, line the dark red walls. Women, their long hair covered with scarves, stand on one side of the small nave, men on the other.

They take turns filling the room with plaintive, old-world chants. Other worshippers stand quietly, hands to their sides, heads bowed.

“This is how we worship, to stay concentrated in prayer,” said St. Eugene member Sarah Cowie.

“We believe that, during the service, God pours himself out. If you get quiet enough in your mind, you can feel, palpably, his presence.”

The 70 or so members of St. Eugene aren’t immigrants from Russia, Eastern Europe or Greece. They are Eugene-area residents, most of them converts from Protestant sects, who have found solace and sustenance in a tradition that dates back 2,000 years to the early Christian church. Cowie and other St. Eugene members are among the growing numbers of Oregonians who are converting to Orthodoxy.

For years, St. Nicholas Orthodox Church in Portland, established in 1895, was Continue reading “The Lure of the Mystical Path – Alice Tallmadge, Oregon, USA”

Orthodox Web

Orthodox Web

Continue reading “Orthodox Web”

 The Fort Ross Orthodox Chapel in Carifornia and Saint Innocent of Alaska (+1879)

 The Fort Ross Orthodox Chapel in Carifornia

and Saint Innocent of Alaska (+1879)

The Chapel was originally built in the mid-1820s. It was the first Russian Orthodox structure in North America outside of Alaska, although Ross had no resident priest. In 1836 Father Ioann Veniaminov visited the settlement and conducted sacraments of marriage, baptisms, and other religious services. Father Veniaminov later became Bishop of Alaska, then Senior Bishop of the Russian Empire. In 1977 he was glorified Saint Innocent by the Russian Orthodox Church. Father Veniaminov had been an active missionary among the Native Alaskan people. Unlike the Spanish, the Russian priests in North America baptized only those natives who demonstrated a knowledge and sincere acceptance of Christian belief.

“The chapel is constructed from wooden boards… It has a small belfry and is rather plain; its entire interior decoration consists of two icons in silver rizas. The chapel at Fort Ross receives almost no income from its members or from those Russians who are occasional visitors.” Journal of Father Ioann Veniaminov, 1836.

The chapel was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake. The foundation crumbled and the walls were ruined; only the roof and two towers remained intact. Between 1916 and 1918, the Chapel was rebuilt using timbers from both the Officials’ Quarters and the Warehouse. On October 5, 1970 the restored Russian chapel was entirely destroyed in an accidental fire. It was reconstructed in 1973. Following Russian Orthodox tradition, some lumber from the burned building was used. The chapel bell melted in the fire, and was recast in Belgium using a rubbing and metal from the original Russian bell. On the bell is a small inscription in Church Slavonic which reads “Heavenly King, receive all, who glorify Him.” Along the lower edge another inscription reads, “Cast at the foundry of Michael Makar Stukolkin, master founder and merchant at the city of St. Petersburg.”

According to Russian Orthodox tradition, the cross on the chapel cupola has a short bar on the top representing a sign nailed to the cross: “Jesus of Nazareth-King of the Jews”; the middle bar represents Christ’s crucifixion; the slanted bottom bar, to which Christ’s feet were nailed, points toward heaven (signifying the thief on the right who repented) and downward (signifying the disposition of the mocking thief).

In 1925, the Chapel began to be used for Orthodox religious services, and it continues to be used for such services every Memorial Day, Fourth of July, and during our Fort Ross Festival on the last Saturday of every July.

Source:

Fort Ross Chapel

FORTROSS

The conversion of a fanatical Jew woman who wanted to kill Elder Ephraim of Arizona, USA

http://conversions1-ebook.blogspot.com

CONVERSIONS 1 – EBOOK

arizona5-1

231171.b

The conversion of a fanatical Jew woman

who wanted to kill Elder Ephraim of Arizona, USA

Everyone knows the high spiritual status of Elder Ephraim of Arizona, USA. A fanatical Jew woman wanted to do evil to the Elder years ago. So, dressed as a pious Christian with long clothes and headcovering, she went to see the Elder. His subordinates told her she could not see him and tried other days. After days we allowed her to see him. She had hidden a knife in her clothes to kill him, and she was suddenly surprised when she saw him standing upright and cried Elder! She saw him flying in the air at a poached stand! She tells her, drop the knife and I’ll come down to talk. The monastery guards came in and disarmed her. Finally the woman repented and believed and was baptized. The Holiness of the Elder appeared once again.

Source:

https://www.facebook.com/Spiritual.trips.in.Holy.Mountain/?hc_ref=ARTmzzwnUt4VHf53LuxNo7AhIe4h-sJgkaTowQNyjfqlxeisjjOY5tzGERaBNICqy9s

Spiritual Trips in Holy Mountain and Holy Land

Link: Orthodox Lima – St Stephen Orthodox Church in Lima, Ohio, USA

http://orthodoxlima.org

Orthodox Lima

St Stephen Orthodox Church in Lima, Ohio, USA

Orthodox Parishes in Alaska

http://e-o-c-m.blogspot.com

EASTERN ORTHODOX CHURCHES AND MONASTERIES

Orthodox Parishes in Alaska

Arrowhead Springs To Antioch – Odyssey To Orthodoxy ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Fr. Peter Gillquist & Fr. Gordon Thomas Walker, USA

http://multilingual-christianity-orthodoxy.blogspot.com

MULTILINGUAL CHRISTIANITY – ORTHODOXY

Arrowhead Springs To Antioch

***

Odyssey To Orthodoxy

by

Fr. Peter Gillquist

& Fr. Gordon Thomas Walker,

USA

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

Arrowhead Springs To Antioch

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

By the summer of 1966, our bubble was starting to burst. As staff members of Campus Crusade for Christ (headquartered at Arrowhead Springs in California) and men in key roles of leadership, we were intent on bringing America’s college students to faith in Christ. And we were further committed to Christ’s Great Commission: bringing the Gospel to the whole world. But that summer, we realized we would have to change our strategy. For we had become convinced from the Scriptures that the Church was the means to fulfilling that Great Commission.

The question was, of course, what is the Church?

By 1968, our National Field Coordinator — Jon Braun, Canadian Director — Ken Berven, African Director — Gordon Walker, Asian Director — Ray Nethery, Regional Directors — Richard Ballew and Peter Gillquist — and a host of others — resigned from Campus Crusade to pursue evangelism through the Church.

We did not want to build and maintain another new organization, at least not right away. Most of us struck out on our own, building house-churches in different parts of the country fashioned after what we saw as the New Testament model. We kept in touch with each other and exchanged ideas and encouragement from our successes and failures. Many of us had taken outside jobs to support ourselves and our families.

By 1973 all of us were expressing a desire to labor more closely together again. Working on our own was frustrating, and we sensed a need for mutual support and accountability. Consequently we decided to meet together in Dallas, Texas in July, 1973. Out of that meeting of about 70 people came a Continue reading “Arrowhead Springs To Antioch – Odyssey To Orthodoxy ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Fr. Peter Gillquist & Fr. Gordon Thomas Walker, USA”