New York Street may be named in honor of Holy Patriarch Tikhon, Apostle of America (+1925)

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NEW YORK OF MY HEART

New York Street may be named in honor

of Holy Patriarch Tikhon, Apostle of America (+1925)

Source:

http://orthochristian.com

http://orthochristian.com/72743.html

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY

The Northern Cross Historical Society of Russian Compatriots in the USA has proposed naming a street in New York City after Holy Patriarch Tikhon (Belavin) of Moscow and All Russia (1865-1925), reports ITAR-TASS.

This initiative is supported by Russians and Orthodox Americans living in New York, hierarchs of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia and the Patriarchal parishes in the USA.

“The petition concerning this will be submitted to the mayor’s office in the next few days, in September it will go through the City Council, and we feel certain that in the coming months we will have a Patriarch Tikhon Street in the city,” said the president of the Northern Cross Society, Yuri Sandulov. It is supposed to extend along East 97th Street from Park Avenue to Fifth Avenue.

According to present New York City municipal laws, at least 20,000 New York citizens must support the renaming of a street.

“There are more than 300,000 Russian-speaking citizens in the city who consider themselves to be children of the Russian Orthodox Church and the Russian Orthodox Church outside of Russia, which is a part of the former. Most of them are enthusiastic about the idea of perpetuating the memory of His Holiness Patriarch Tikhon, who became the first patriarch after the restoration of the Patriarchate in Russia” in 1918, noted Sandulov.

Patriarch Tikhon’s ministry was closely connected with America: between 1898 and 1907 he was Bishop of North America, Alaska and the Aleutians. Through St. Tikhon’s efforts many Orthodox books were translated into English, and St. Nicholas Cathedral in New York was built (the cathedral is situated on the very part of 97th Street that will probably be named after the patriarch). He also undertook an enormous amount of missionary work—dozens of new churches were open during his time as bishop there.

“Orthodox Christians of America remember that Holy Patriarch Tikhon succeeded in preserving the Church in the circumstances of the most cruel persecutions against the faithful that followed the October revolution in Russia. He was our great compatriot who greatly contributed to the rapprochement between Russia and the USA. It is particularly necessary to remember his spiritual and secular exploits now, when the tension between our countries has increased,” believes the president of the Northern Cross Society.

New York City, August 1, 2014

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Bringing the Orthodox Faith to the African-American Community – From the OCA Diocese of New York and New Jersey

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USA OF MY HEART

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Bringing the Orthodox Faith to the African-American Community

From the OCA Diocese of New York and New Jersey

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com/2016/08/bringing-orthodox-faith-african-american-community/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

“We would love to reach out to African-Americans in our community, but we don’t know how.”

“I don’t know where to begin.”

“I’m afraid we’ll be seen as too white and too exotic.”

“How do we merge the Black church and culture with [fill in Orthodox ethnic group of choice]?”

Sound familiar? Orthodox parishes across the country struggle with outreach to various ethnic groups — wishing to expand the parish’s evangelistic efforts in bringing Holy Orthodoxy to Blacks, Latinos, and Asians — but lacking the knowledge, insights, and tools to do so. With the biggest of hearts and greatest of desires, this area of evangelism … bringing and sharing Orthodoxy with ethnic minority groups … can nevertheless seem daunting enough to persuade many to never even begin the effort.

To address these concerns and provide information, ideas, and tools to train and equip clergy and laity to begin effective outreach to African-Americans, the Diocese’s Commission on Mission and Evangelism sponsored a one-day training workshop called “Bringing the Orthodox Faith to the African-American Community.” Thanks to the gracious hosting of Saints Peter and Paul Church in Manville NJ on Saturday, 16 July 2016, the workshop brought together over 40 people from across two deaneries as well as outside of the diocese to hear and learn from two outstanding speakers on African-American outreach: Father Alexii Altschul (a founder of the Brotherhood of Saint Moses the Black), and Father Deacon Turbo Qualls (the Brotherhood’s Chapter Development coordinator).

Father Deacon Turbo spoke first in the morning, following a Molieben (prayer service) for the “Beginning of Any Good Work.” He addressed a powerful theme: Orthodoxy is not “the White Man’s Religion” and was never imposed on Africans brought to America via the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade (and, further, that Orthodoxy, unlike virtually all of Western Europe and Western Christianity, was never involved in the evil of such human trafficking). Rather, Orthodoxy is an historic African faith that has had roots in Africa since the time of the Apostles: the Acts of the Apostles notes the baptism of the Ethiopian eunuch by Saint Thomas; and Church Fathers, many of whom lived and were from northern African nations like Libya, Egypt, and Carthage.

Father Alexii spoke in the afternoon about his experiences as a white man married to a black woman, raising a blended family, who ultimately found and embraced the ancient Orthodox Christian Faith. He began “Reconciliation Ministries” (now known as Reconciliation Services, it continues to serve the poor and marginalized of the Troost Avenue neighborhood of Kansas City). He, his late wife, and community started Saint Mary of Egypt Orthodox Church, now a parish of the Serbian Orthodox Church in North America.

After deliberating further opportunities for mutual discussion and networking, the workshop ended with another Molieben “For the Cessation of Strife” as found in the Great Book of Needs, Volume IV.

Plans are underway for more conferences in this outreach series beginning later this year.

Sherie Mercier, USA: Called To Orthodoxy ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* A former Pentecostal minister and Independent Old Catholic Priest’s conversion story to the Orthodox faith

https://usaofmyheart.wordpress.com

USA OF MY HEART

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Michigan, USA

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Called To Orthodoxy

╰⊰¸¸.•¨*

A former Pentecostal minister and Independent Old Catholic Priest’s conversion story to the Orthodox faith

by

Sherie Mercier, Michigan, USA

Where do I begin? I was born and raised in St. Joseph, Michigan, on the shores of SW Lake Michigan – across the lake from Chicago, 61 years ago. My parents were not very religious, in fact, they attended a Methodist church in my hometown. The pastor was a medical doctor and eventually left the active ministry and set up shop as a General Family practitioner. My parents stopped attending church and after that I never remember them ever stepping into a church at all, even to this day. My mother is deceased but my father is still alive and I have never seen him enter a church.

So, eventually, around the age of 7 or so, I went to a Baptist church with my neighbors and continued to do so until my teenage years. I then set out to check different denominations, usually joining them, then leaving because something didn’t “feel right”. Of course, our home town had a huge Roman Catholic following, plus my maternal grandmother had been Roman Catholic herself.

I remember seeing statues of Mary and crucifixes. Our public school in that day followed the Roman Catholic system of meatless Fridays, usually fish sticks or mac and cheese. So, I became interested in the Roman Catholic faith. But it was not to be at all until years later.

I graduated high school, enlisted in the US Army, did a short stint and then married my first husband in Scotland. We settled back in Michigan but only for the summer of 1974, then moved to Arizona. I again, searched and Continue reading “Sherie Mercier, USA: Called To Orthodoxy ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* A former Pentecostal minister and Independent Old Catholic Priest’s conversion story to the Orthodox faith”

The 2 Calendars of the Eastern Orthodox Church – A letter to an American friend

http://americaofmyheart.wordpress.com

http://schismaticsreturntochurch.wordpress.com

SCHISMATICS RETURN TO CHURCH

AMERICA OF MY HEART

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Dear friend,

The Eastern Orthodox Church have 2 calendars. The New Calendar and the Old Calendar.

Some Orthodox countries have the new calendar and some the old calendar.

The Orthodox Church of Serbia, Russia, Mount Athos in Greece, Poland, Holy Land-Jerusalem and Sinai have the Old Calendar and the have Christmas on January 7.

The Orthodox Church of Greece, Romania, Asia Minor etc. have the New Calendar and the have Christmas on December 25.

But all these are local Churches are One Church: Eastern Orthodox Church.

But be careful!

There is a team who founded in Greece on 1924 that is a SCHISMATIC TEAM. They called “Genuine Orthodox Christians” but is out of Church.

If you have a “Genuine Orthodox Christian” near you don’t go there, because is out of Church!

Here in Greece the Old Calendarists are schismatics.

Only the Mount Athos Monasteries have the Old Calendar but they are in the Church like Russians, Serbians etc.

Only the Monastery of Esfigmenou in Mount Athos is a schismatic monastery that is “Genuite Orthodox Christian” monastery, now.

Here you find a Canonical Orthodox parish in North America:

https://oca.org/parishes

https://oca.org/directories/na-churches

Saint Nectarios of Aigina Island in Greece who died on 1920 prophesied the schism of old calendar of Greece!

St. Nectarios of Aegina (+1920) saind to the Nuns of his Monastery in Aegina Island, Greece:

“After my death will take place a great schism. You will follow the Main-Executive Church” (St. Nektarios of Aegina – Written in the Proceedings of the Monastery of Saint Nectarios).

With love in Christ,

Abel Gkiouzelis

gkiouz.abel@gmail.com

http://gkiouzelis.wordpress.com

Confession: The Healing Sacrament – By Jim Forest, Utah, USA & the Netherlands

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ORTHODOXY IS LOVE

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Confession: The Healing Sacrament

by

Jim Forest,

Utah, USA & the Netherlands

Source:

http://www.antiochian.org

http://www.antiochian.org/content/confession-healing-sacrament

A young monk said to the great ascetic Abba Sisoes: “Abba, what should I do? I fell.” The elder answered: “Get up!” The monk said: “I got up and I fell again!” The elder replied: “Get up again!” But the young monk asked: “For how long should I get up when I fall?” “Until your death,” answered Abba Sisoes. —Sayings of the Desert Fathers

“When I went to my first confession,” a friend told me, “tears took the place of the sins I meant to utter. The priest simply told me that it wasn’t necessary to enumerate everything and that it was just vanity to suppose that our personal sins are worse than everyone else’s. Which, by the way, was something of a relief, since it wasn’t possible for me to remember all the sins of my first thirty-odd years of life. It made me think of the way the father received his prodigal son—he didn’t even let his son finish his carefully rehearsed speech. It’s truly amazing.”

Another friend told me that he was so worried about all he had to confess that he decided to write it down. “So I made a list of my sins and brought it with me. The priest saw the paper in my hand, took it, looked through the list, tore it up, and gave it back to Continue reading “Confession: The Healing Sacrament – By Jim Forest, Utah, USA & the Netherlands”

Journeying East: Spiritual Sanctuary in the Orthodox Church – Forrest Long, USA

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http://walkingbytheseaorthodoxy.wordpress.com

https://usaofmyheart.wordpress.com

ORTHODOX HEART

WALKING BY THE SEA – ORTHODOXY

USA OF MY HEART

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Alabama, USA

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Journeying East:

Spiritual Sanctuary in the Orthodox Church

by Forrest Long, USA

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.comHERE

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

The pungent aroma of incense fills the air. In the dim candle light, smoke ascends high toward the domed ceiling and, as the eye follows its upward spiral, one can imagine gazing into heaven itself. The architecture, the icons, the aroma, the awesome silence — the sensory perception of all that surrounds you transports you into another world. No, this is not your typical Baptist church, far from it.

So what is a Baptist pastor with over twenty-five years of ministry doing in a Russian Orthodox chapel? The male choir is in place and the priest comes out to begin the evening liturgy of vespers, all in Church Slavonic, the language of the “old country.” Not a word is understood as I listen intently to the progression of the liturgy, yet deep in my soul there is a sense that I have entered heaven itself. For an hour and a half the service continues and no one seems to mind standing through it, even the frail old monks who have experienced this for a lifetime.

This was my first experience of an Orthodox vespers and it was a life-changing experience, an affirmation that I was on the right path.

Going back to the question, what was I as a Baptist minister doing in a Russian Orthodox vesper service at Holy Trinity Monastery in Jordanville, New York?

And why over the past several decades have so many evangelicals in North America made the journey to the Eastern Orthodox Church?

I have read the personal pilgrimage of others, Peter Gillquist, Frederica Mathewes-Green, Jaroslav Pelikan and others, but I can only write out of my own experience.

As I look back now over my training in preparation for ministry I realize I learned nothing about the Eastern Orthodox Church; as I have talked with other Protestant ministers, for the most part their knowledge runs between minimal and non-existent. If I were asked I suppose I would have said that it was some ancient Eastern form of the Church, just another denomination but comparable to the Roman Catholic Church. The architecture and vestments may have been different, but apart from that I knew nothing about it. To be honest, its existence probably never crossed my mind. But other things did and that is where the journey began.

Coming out of ministerial preparation and being thrust into pastoral ministry, I was an idealist filled with answers, cutting-edge techniques and right theology. I was ready to ignite my first church with new life.

The early 70’s was a time of change in the church. New winds were blowing. Contemporary theology was challenging how we thought about God and the church; charismatic teaching and practice were challenging how we worshiped and “did” church; the “Jesus movement” was challenging the church to a more vibrant life. Changes were coming in worship, early stirrings that have led to where we are in the contemporary worship scene today.

As a pastor, part of my responsibility was to give leadership in worship; the more I read about and viewed the changing scene, the more I was coming to understand that modern worship could be just about anything you want it to be, just about anything was pleasing to God.

The walls were being pushed outward, sometimes beyond the limits in the minds of an older generation who sometimes were resistant to change. But the doors of change were open and a new contemporary breeze was blowing in, perceived by many as salvation for churches in decline that were running out of ideas of how to attract the un-churched.

During these early years of my ministry I began to broaden my reading as I focused on the church and on worship. I came across the writings of Robert Webber, who opened a new door for me and challenged me with a whole new perspective on worship and the church. It was a challenge to look beyond the familiar, not to discredit the old, even ancient forms of Christian worship, expressed in various liturgies.

I was a novice in this area, being immersed in the simplicity of non-liturgical Baptist worship. Slowly I began to open my thinking to a form of worship that was so rich with meaning and theological depth.

As a “good Protestant,” I had always considered such worship as being “too Roman Catholic.” In searching, I came to see the depth of my prejudice and my bias toward one particular form of worship, a perspective which would change gradually over time.

About the same time I read a book by another author previously unknown to me, Peter Gillquist. In The Physical Side Of Being Spiritual, Gillquist, who was himself on a spiritual quest that would eventually lead him into the Antiochian Orthodox Church, pushed my inquisitive door open a bit wider. He challenged me to think deeper about worship in its physical forms and symbols and challenged me to explore spirituality from a perspective previously unknown to me. The journey continued.

Over my years of ministry, as I sought to give spiritual leadership to the congregations I served, I was at the same time on my own spiritual pilgrimage. Many times I was uncertain of where I was going, but I kept pushing doors and exploring different pathways. As I looked around me at contemporary church life, I was disheartened by the all too-visible “easy-believism” and “cheap grace” that Dietrich Bonhoeffer wrote so disparagingly about in his Cost Of Discipleship.

I came to realize that the church was so often a follower of trends and “here-today-gone-tomorrow” ideas on methodology, ministry, worship, church growth and spirituality. Everyone seemed to have their own concept of the “New Testament Church,” resulting in a dizzying array of books and programs offering the answer.

Sadly I watched as many well-meaning, but I believe misdirected leaders divided churches (yes, often Baptist churches) and went off with a handful of followers to build their own version of “the New Testament Church.”

My quest was never an obsession, but always in my field of vision as I read and thought in areas of worship, personal spiritual development and the church. I always believed there had to be answers to my questions. I never thought that those answers would take me back beyond the Reformation and my divided Protestant heritage, to a time when the church spoke with one voice. I began reading some of the early church documents as well as writings of the early Church Fathers, all of which opened a whole new world to me.

Time moved on. It was not until the late 90’s, after twenty-five years of pastoral ministry, that I was introduced to the Eastern Orthodox Church. One Sunday morning before worship, one of our couples came through the door with a friend who was visiting for the first time.

The introductions were made and there before me stood an imposing and impressive gentleman about my age, but with a long flowing, graying beard and long hair, dressed in a “ministerial” black suit. I had no idea at the time that he was a Russian Orthodox priest and I couldn’t see the clerical collar under his beard. He appeared to be intently interested in our worship and to my surprise remained after the service to join in my Sunday School class.

I was teaching a series of studies on the spiritual disciplines and happened that morning to be teaching on the discipline of prayer. Here I was, the “expert” with all the answers. My class was very interactive and discussion played a key role in the learning process.

Our guest felt very comfortable to enter into the discussion, and I discovered as I listened to him that here was a man with an understanding of our topic that ran deeper than the level at which I was teaching that morning. I found that my heart was hungering for a deeper experience of the spirituality of prayer and here was someone I wanted to get to know better. It was only after the morning was over that I was told this visitor, a quiet and unassuming man who displayed a sense of deep spirituality, was Father Innocent, a Russian Orthodox priest.

The friendship that developed out of this initial encounter led to many visits to his home, times of question and discussion, good conversation that gently nudged me toward the Orthodox Church.

Never once did I ever hear him criticize the Baptist church or put down my theology or practice. But gradually and gently he led me far beyond where I was. I would come home with a book to read, an Orthodox magazine or some article he felt I would find interesting.

My questions were being answered, the issues were being diffused and in the depth of my soul I knew I was on the right path. But it took moving from Nova Scotia to Birmingham, Alabama to actually become Orthodox.

In 2005 at Pascha, I was chrismated into the Antiochian Orthodox Church at the Church of the Annunciation, under the spiritual leadership of Father Nabil Fino, who brought me as a catechumen into the Church. From Father Innocent to Father Nabil, God has graciously led me step by step into the Church.

There was a time when I was so theologically opinionated and narrow in my views, that I wouldn’t have given a thought about moving toward the Eastern Orthodox Church. In my Protestant frame of mind I wouldn’t exercise such freedom. God does work in mysterious ways.

Today, in the Eastern Orthodox Church, my questions have found answers and I have discovered a well-grounded, unchanging liturgy, theology and spirituality that have stood the tests of time, being rooted in the Apostles, the Early Church Fathers, the Desert Fathers and Mothers, as well as the saints through the ages. The rich spiritual heritage of the various forms of the Eastern Orthodox Church enrich my soul, as I have come to understand and appreciate those ancient forms that are so spiritually relevant for our world today.

My journey has led me to a true spiritual sanctuary.

About Yoga – Journey to Orthodoxy

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WHAT ABOUT YOGA?

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http://journeytoorthodoxy.com/?s=yoga

About Yoga

Journey to Orthodoxy